Wales Co-operative Centre

Canolfan Cydweithredol Cymru

Posts Tagged ‘ERDF

New Capital Gains Tax rules encourage owners to sell to their staff / Rheolau newydd ar gyfer Treth ar Enillion Cyfalaf yn annog perchnogion busnes i werthu i’w staff

leave a comment »

New Capital Gains Tax rules encourage owners to sell to their staff / Rheolau newydd ar gyfer Treth ar Enillion Cyfalaf yn annog perchnogion busnes i werthu i’w staff

Business owners across the UK could be benefiting from selling their businesses to their employees when new Capital Gains Tax Reliefs come into force this April. Business owners who sell a controlling stake in their company to an Employee Share Trust, which is owned and run by all the businesses employees will be able to benefit from drastically reduced tax on the profit from the sale.

In Wales, the Wales Co-operative Centre is hosting a number of breakfast seminars looking at the benefits of employee ownership and how the new tax incentives can benefit business owners who would like to move on from the business.

The events in Cardiff, Carmarthen and Bodnant in North Wales will also consider the employee owned trust model, how employee ownership works and the benefits for the business owner and the employees.

The seminars will be of interest to business owners interested in looking at their exit strategies and to business advisors who want to know more about the approach..

Rhian Edwards is Manager of the Welsh Government and ERDF funded Succession project at the Wales Co-operative Centre. She commented,

“This new tax relief makes it extremely attractive for business owners to consider employee ownership as a planned exit strategy. It offers the best of both worlds, a tax efficient exit strategy and an approach that engages employees and puts them in charge of their own futures”.

Further information can be found on the Wales Co-operative Centres Website http://www.walescooperative.org/capital-gains-tax-events.

Places can be booked directly by calling the Centre on 0300 111 5050

 

Gallai perchnogion busnes ledled y DU elwa ar werthu eu busnesau i’w gweithwyr pan ddaw Ryddhad Treth ar Enillion Cyfalaf newydd i rym fis Ebrill eleni. Bydd perchnogion busnes sy’n gwerthu cyfran reoli yn eu cwmni i Ymddiriedolaeth Perchnogaeth Gweithwyr, sy’n eiddo i holl weithwyr y busnes ac yn cael ei reoli ganddynt, yn gallu elwa ar ostyngiad treth enfawr ar yr elw o’r gwerthiant.

Yng Nghymru, mae Canolfan Cydweithredol Cymru’n cynnal nifer o seminarau brecwast i edrych ar fanteision perchnogaeth gweithwyr a sut y gall y cymhelliant treth newydd fod yn fuddiol i berchnogion busnes a hoffai symud ymlaen o’r busnes.

Bydd y digwyddiadau yng Nghaerdydd, Caerfyrddin a Bodnant yng Ngogledd Cymru hefyd yn ystyried yr ymddiriedolaethau newydd, sut y mae perchnogaeth gweithwyr yn gweithio a’r manteision ar gyfer perchennog y busnes a’r gweithwyr.

Bydd y seminarau o ddiddordeb i berchnogion busnes sydd â diddordeb mewn ystyried eu strategaethau ymadael ac i ymgynghorwyr busnes sy’n dymuno gwybod rhagor am yr ymagwedd er mwyn cynghori’u cleientiaid.

Rhian Edwards yw Rheolwr y prosiect Olyniaeth dan nawdd Llywodraeth Cymru a Chronfa Datblygu Rhanbarthol Ewrop yng Nghanolfan Cydweithredol Cymru. Dywedodd,

“Mae’r rhyddhad treth newydd hwn yn hynod o ddeniadol i berchnogion busnes ystyried perchnogaeth gweithwyr yn strategaeth ymadael fwriadol. Mae’n cynnig y gorau o ddau fyd, sef strategaeth ymadael sy’n effeithlon o ran treth ac ymagwedd sy’n ymglymu gweithwyr a’u gwneud yn gyfrifol am eu dyfodol eu hunain.”

Mae rhagor o wybodaeth ar gael ar wefan Canolfan Cydweithredol Cymru http://www.walescooperative.org/capital-gains-tax-events.

Gellir cadw lle’n uniongyrchol hefyd trwy ffonio’r Ganolfan ar 0300 111 5050

 

 

 

Wales Co-operative Centre

The Wales Co-operative Centre was set up thirty years ago and ever since has been helping businesses grow, people to find work and communities to tackle the issues that matter to them. Its advisors work co-operatively across Wales, providing expert, flexible and reliable support to develop sustainable businesses and strong, inclusive communities. www.walescooperative.org

Succession and Consortia Project

The Wales Co-operative Centre’s Succession and Consortia project is funded by Welsh Government and European Regional Development Fund. It offers support to business owners and employees considering employee ownership and creation of worker co-operatives. It also offers support to businesses working to work together to form co-operative consortia.

Canolfan Cydweithredol Cymru

Sefydlwyd Canolfan Cydweithredol Cymru ddeng mlynedd ar hugain yn ôl ac ers hynny bu’n helpu busnesau i dyfu, pobl i gael gwaith a chymunedau i ddatrys y problemau sydd o bwys iddynt. Mae ymgynghorwyr y Ganolfan yn gweithio’n gydweithredol ledled Cymru, gan ddarparu cefnogaeth arbenigol, hyblyg a dibynadwy er mwyn datblygu busnesau cynaliadwy a chymunedau cadarn a chynhwysol. www.walescooperative.org

Prosiect Olyniaeth a Chonsortia

Ariannir prosiect Olyniaeth a Chonsortia Canolfan Cydweithredol Cymru gan Lywodraeth Cymru a Chronfa Datblygu Rhanbarthol Ewrop. Mae’n cynnig cefnogaeth i berchnogion busnes a gweithwyr sy’n ystyried perchnogaeth gweithwyr a chreu mentrau cydweithredol y gweithwyr. Mae hefyd yn cynnig cefnogaeth i fusnesau sy’n gweithio ar gydweithio i ffurfio consortia cydweithredol.

 

Digital Inclusion is one of our most effective weapons in the fight against poverty

leave a comment »

Get Merthyr Tydfil Online launch

Get Merthyr Tydfil Online Launch: (Left to Right) Angela Jones – Communities 2.0, Derek Walker, Chief Executive Wales Co-operative Centre, Mike Owen, Chief Executive Merthyr Valleys Homes, Eleanor Marks, Welsh Government, Ian Benbow, Head of Service, Social Regeneration, Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council.

Derek Walker, Chief Executive of the Wales Co-operative Centre, looks at how digital inclusion, financial inclusion and social enterprise support work together to protect people from poverty and to mitigate against its impact.

Today is the launch of Get Swansea Online, a local initiative that aims to help Swansea’s estimated 45,000 digitally excluded residents to use the internet. This is the latest in a series of initiatives brokered by Communities 2.0, the Welsh Government digital inclusion project.

At yesterday’s launch of another initiative, Get Merthyr Tydfil Online, Minister for Communities and Tackling Poverty Jeff Cuthbert congratulated Communities 2.0 on its collaborative and partnership led approach. He emphasised the importance of helping people to get online and use the internet to save money and to find jobs. He stated that “digital exclusion compounds isolation” and said that Get Merthyr Tydfil Online has the potential to “reach the most digitally and financially excluded citizens” in the county. Last week the Minister visited a similar initiative in the Caia Park area of Wrexham. The political will is certainly there to ensure that everyone in Wales has access to the internet and the skills to use it effectively in the fight against poverty – but there is still more to be done.

We are very lucky here in the Wales Co-operative Centre. Through our work as lead partner of Communities 2.0, and through our own projects on financial inclusion and social enterprise development, we see the positive improvements our interventions can bring to the lives of people in real danger of falling below the bread line. Across Wales we see people, helped by Communities 2.0 and our financial inclusion initiatives, gain IT skills and use those skills to get jobs and get out of debt.  Communities 2.0 recently supported Torfaen and Blaenau Gwent MIND’s social enterprise arm ‘Training in MIND’ with an investment of nearly £5,000. The support will help pay for new laptop and desktop computers in their IT suite. The IT suite is manned by volunteers running drop-in sessions for people to update their IT skills and search for jobs. The organisation is currently setting up a work club for people who attend the centre. This is an excellent example of a social enterprise integrating digital inclusion and anti-poverty measures into its social aims and on the ground delivery.

At the Wales Co-operative Centre we also see the difference in our communities when they are engaged and enabled and can build social enterprises that reinvest their surpluses back into training and job creation. Galeri Caernarfon Cyf is a social enterprise that is focussed on regenerating the town of Caernarfon. Over the years it has regenerated properties and spaces in the town and opened up a highly successful arts centre. It now employs 36 full time equivalent jobs directly and supports over 40 in its tenant businesses. It is estimated that this one social enterprise has an economic impact of almost £1.3m to the economies of Gwynedd and Ynys Môn. In fact, Galeri is among just 6% of firms in Gwynedd that employ more than 25 people.

The Wales Co-operative Centre receives funding from a number of different sources to allow us to deliver our support work to communities across Wales. Our funders include the European Regional Development Fund, Welsh Government and the Oak Foundation.

This year, we have also led on a project which encourages individuals to use the services of local credit unions to help them ensure that their rent payment gets to their landlords – meaning that they can keep a roof over their own and their family’s heads. In Caerphilly, development staff are working directly with individuals to suggest ways in which they can use existing support and advice to make the money they have last longer.

We are also managing and promoting www.moneymadeclearwales.org  which offers signposting to advice on saving and loans, debt and benefits. Access to digital resources is now intrinsically linked to good money management and to allowing individuals to take control of their own lives.

Financial and digital inclusion doesn’t just reduce isolation, but it allows freedom, liberty and empowerment. It allows individuals and groups to take their next steps forward – individually in the jobs market or as entrepreneurs, and collectively as empowered communities and social enterprises.

We believe that by integrating financial and digital inclusion with community engagement and real support for social enterprises and charities, it is possible to alleviate some of the poverty that currently exists in Wales. But, just as importantly, we believe that this sort of support is empowering. It allows people to make decisions about their own futures. It allows them to build their skills and their confidence and it empowers individuals to lift themselves out of poverty and stay out of it.

There’s more to poverty than being out of work

leave a comment »

The recent consultation on the new EU funding framework had a strong focus on tackling poverty through increasing employment: ERDF programmes would create jobs; and ESF programmes would give people the skills needed to do those jobs.  No one would argue with the positive impact this would have on the Welsh economy and on Welsh communities.  Indeed, the Wales Co-operative Centre believes that co-operatives and social enterprises can be the engine house of such an economic regeneration.  UK figures show that the social enterprise sector is growing faster than the economy as a whole, and these businesses employ more people relative to turnover.  You get more bang for your ERDF buck with a social enterprise.

There is a big “but” coming.  That is: if the new funding framework only allows spend on job creation and developing skills for work, we are not addressing the impact of poverty on large sections of the Welsh population.  We would be ignoring, for example, the issue of in-work poverty.  With zero-hours contracts on the rise, an increasing number of people in work lack the financial stability that used to come with having a job.  And people who are beyond working age are disproportionately likely to live in poverty: a jobs-based EU funding framework will do nothing for them.

The Wales Co-operative Centre currently delivers community projects that are designed to mitigate the impact of poverty and allow people to take control of their own financial circumstances, whether they are unemployed, in work or retired.  For example, we lead the Welsh Government funded Communities 2.0 project which helps people get the benefits of being online. Age Cymru Swansea Bay manage a Communities 2.0 initiative which brings the internet into the homes of older people.  Peripatetic advice workers carry laptops and support their clients to set up internet banking, to save money online and more.  Using digital ways of achieving financial inclusion transforms the lives of older people.  Rather than relying on others, they are in control of their own money.  Savings in utility bills can amount to hundreds of pounds a year, making people feel more confident about switching on the heating as winter comes.

We believe there should be a place in the tackling poverty strands of the new EU funding framework to allow this kind of work to continue.  The argument for an emphasis on jobs is well made, but poverty in Welsh communities is not just about unemployment, it is also about people being able to manage their lives so that they are better off, in work or not.  Let’s hope the final framework has breadth as well as depth.

 

Written by Ieuan Nash

September 10, 2013 at 3:06 pm

New Minister marks launch of Get Neath Port Talbot Online

leave a comment »

Congratulations to Get Neath Port Talbot Online, the latest strategic initiative from the Welsh Government’s Communities 2.0 programme, which is led by the Wales Co-operative Centre.  Get NPT Online was launched by Minister for Communities and Tackling Poverty, Jeff Cuthbert at Briton Ferry library this week.

jeff2

Jeff Cuthbert, Minister for Communities and Tackling Poverty, at the launch with members of the Briton Ferry Photographic Club.

Designed to tackle poverty by overcoming barriers to work, the initiative has challenging targets for helping people become confident in using computers, and in finding work online.

Through the Communities 2.0 programme, Wales Co-operative Centre staff have brokered a partnership between NPT Homes, Coastal Housing and the local Communities First organisation, to target support at those in greatest need.  Front line staff of all the partner organisations will be trained to help their clients take the first steps towards getting online.  This will be backed up by focussed training and support from a team of volunteers.  People who were previously excluded from job opportunities through lack of skills will set up their own e-mail addresses, develop online CVs and learn how to search job sites.  As a result, they will become included as part of the modern world.

Katy, Rachel and Kevin - the Get NPT Online Outreach Team.

Katy, Rachel and Kevin – the Get NPT Online Outreach Team.

The beauty of Get NPT Online is that it is a genuinely local response to the problems of poverty, worklessness and social exclusion.  It works with the community, not on it.  Get NPT Online is sustainable, because digital inclusion will be embedded in the working practices of the partner organisations.

Across Wales, the Wales Co-operative Centre is delivering programmes in communities that have a tangible economic benefit.  Thanks to funding from the Welsh Government and European Regional Development Fund, people in Neath Port Talbot have a head start.

%d bloggers like this: